In politics, it's amusing to observe how the candidate chooses to be "politically correct" instead of taking the more difficult road to simply be "correct". Of course, to define "correct", you have to have a reference point, morally or otherwise, to determine just how far from "correct" that "politically correct" politician is positioning himself or herself.

For example, a politician who decides to take a position on "rights" versus what is "right" makes a "politically correct" decision. Standing up for an individual's "rights" is today considerably more popular than proclaiming what is truly "right". We see it every day in the Washington D.C. headlines.

Remember, being politically correct does not require an absolute baseline or reference point for correctness.

The same is true in the world of drinking water and home water purifiers. Everybody who sells bottled water, water filters or home water purifiers would have you believe that they have the one and only correct way to take care of your drinking water problems.

Obviously, each individual cannot be "correct". But by choosing to tell you only parts of the story, or by trying to confuse the customer with carefully-chosen words designed to mislead your into believing what he is selling is far less than you are really is getting the salesman/individual is not lying---he's simply being politically correct---and water associations, manufacturers and water dealers condone this "politically-correct" approach to marketing.

For example. Water dealers who sell carbon filters tell you that their systems are removing 99% of the chemicals from drinking water. This is their "politically correct" marketing approach.

What they do not tell you is that carbon filters can only deal with approximately 2% of all types of water chemicals, specifically those of an organic(carbon-based) nature.

The "correct" answer is therefore that carbon filters remove 99% of roughly 2% of all water contaminants---or they are about 2% effective in overall water treatment.

The filter industry does not like the "correct" answer, so they will continue to mislead you by throwing the "politically correct" 99% number in your face, hoping that you don't look into the problem any further.

Another common, politically correct approach to marketing carbon filters, an approach used by many multi-level marketing programs, is to back off completely from any water filter performance claims---saying that "...it is difficult to determine how this filter will perform, because everyone's (tap) water is different". What a cop-out and what an incredibly "politically-correct" position to take.

Another common, politically correct approach to marketing carbon filters, an approach used by many multi-level marketing programs, is to back off completely from any water filter performance claims---saying that "...it is difficult to determine how this filter will perform, because everyone's (tap) water is different".

What a cop-out and what an incredibly "politically-correct" position to take.

Again, the correct position, but unfortunately the one not taken, would be to level with the consumer and tell them exactly what percentage of which chemicals the filter will remove, and over what period of time that the filter can be expected to remove those chemicals.

Water "softeners" have become water "conditioners", simply because it is now politically correct to avoid reminding consumers that these water "conditioners" still put loads of sodium into household drinking water.

It's been the sodium scare over the last two decades that has forced water softener dealers to change their terminology to a more politically-correct term "conditioner" to preempt customer concerns about sodium content in their drinking water.

Reverse osmosis water filters probably have the widest and wildest range of "politically correct" marketing programs.

To many water dealers it is politically correct to obfuscate any discussion about how many thousands of gallons of water are wasted every year by a home-use reverse osmosis system.

Can you imagine reverse osmosis salespersons telling you during the California seven year drought that their handy dandy under-sink water system would waste you 10,000 gallons of water every year---when simultaneously your family was desperately trying to save water by taking 3 minute showers, putting bricks in the toilet holding tank and re-cycling your dishwater?

It was "politically correct" for the reverse osmosis salesperson not to tell you those things. He wasn't lying to you---he just chose to kill the messenger who might bring you that bad news.

More news that the messenger was bringing you about reverse osmosis, but the dealer chose not to tell you was that a large percentage of the reverse osmosis membranes sold in the United States in the last 20 years were impregnated with traces of a deadly, toxic chemical banned by Proposition 65---1,4 Dioxane.

The reverse osmosis industry uses this known carcinogenic chemical in producing that reverse osmosis membrane that is hidden under your kitchen sink---but they have decided that it would be "politically correct" to avoid any mention of that on their products---something which is required by California State law.

And last but not least, the bottled water business is burning the midnight oil in an attempt to come up with a new set of "politically correct" labels for their bottled water which heretofore had no indications as to where the source was.

The Food and Drug Association, noting that often bottled and tap water come from the same sources, has taken the "correct" approach(for a change) and required bottlers to tell their customers where their high-priced bottled water is coming from.

So, how do you sort out what is "politically-correct" clap trap from correct, factual information regarding the quality of water produced by the various types of water systems you may consider for your home or the quality of water sold in water stores or delivered to your home or office?

It's quite easy when you and the salesperson have the same "reference point" for being correct. Select the purest water that one can possibly find in nature---a raindrop as it first leaves the cloud.

This raindrop is free from all types of chemicals, salts, bacteria, radioactivity, heavy metals and the like. It is exactly the same water as is produced by a steam distillation system.

Therefore, ask your salesperson how his or her water purity compares with your reference point---the purity of steam distilled water---and, barring an outright lie by the dealer, you will be able to determine how one system compares with another.

Remember, without an absolute reference point as to what is correct(or completely pure), you can easily be fooled by the "politically correct" marketing pitches of unscrupulous water dealers.

>dftyt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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